Branding: Defining Your Company

What Does Your Company Stand For?

Branding your company or service can be a great asset. Brand-driven advertisers understand this very well. They understand the emotional substructure of good advertising. If you don’t stir the heart, goes the reasoning, you can’t stir the pocketbook. That’s why Super Bowl advertisers will work hard— and spend millions to leave you laughing. Or crying. Or angry.

To build your brand, begin by thinking through exactly what it is you sell and why customers choose your product or service. Identify the promise you are making to your customers. For instance, you may manufacture vacuum cleaners, but what you’re really selling is a better way to clean house. You must also define what makes your product more desirable to the customers you’re targeting than that of your competition. With a strong brand, you don’t have to sell nearly as long or as hard. Customers know what you stand for before the pitch or proposal.

Here’s how to give your company the kind of brand identity that will help drive sales:

Define Your Personality
A successful  brand becomes an emotional bond that builds customer loyalty. A brand includes your logo, color scheme, taglines, slogan, design elements and more.

Build Recognition
You want the company personality to be easily identifiable at every customer touch point, from word of mouth to final sale. Make sure that every bit and byte of packaging, presentations, communications, and marketing speaks with a brand-consistent look and voice. That includes vehicle graphics, trade show displays and booths, storefront or office signage, banners and web ads, print ads, posters and point of purchase displays, in other words, everything.

Get Inside the customer’s mind
You need a serious fix on what will propel people to buy so you can gear your messages accordingly.  Ask yourself: what need will you fill for the customer? What problem can you solve? How can I make it easier for them? Once you know that, you know what will trigger a market response.

But defining what that brand is and what it will mean to your customers is complicated. When counting your abstract assets, for instance, try putting the customer relationship AHEAD of brand on the ledger sheet. And the product? Channel money into making it the best it can be, both in quality and in the manner it satisfies your customers’ deepest desires. Let those two things drive how you communicate with your market, and you’ll have a powerful branding strategy that pushes the numbers up on your balance sheet.