The Golden Ratio

The proportion for Golden Ratio is 1:1.618. It is a mathematical equation that has found its way into design practices as well. The golden ratio has been scientifically proven to be beautiful. The best example to understand the importance of the Golden Ratio can be traced back to one of the most famous paintings: the Mona Lisa. The painting itself uses the Golden Ratio.

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The Fibonacci Sequence

This sequence is the sum of two numbers before it. The Greeks used this practice as a way to help them form a visual pattern to help with their design. It is done by creating a sequence of squares and putting them side by side and to create a spiral of rectangles. This is known as the Golden Spiral. What’s amazing is that even though this is a mathematical equation, there are a lot of natural instances that show the presence of this concept in their structure as well. In nature such flowers and even shells have a hint of the Golden Ratio.

Golden Ratio in Graphic Design

Golden Ratio adds structure to design, which otherwise has an expressive nature. An easy method of applying the Golden Ratio to any element is multiplying the size of the element by 1.618 for figuring out the size of another element or overlaying the Golden Spiral and adjusting the placement of objects.

Using Golden Ratio for Typography

Typography refers to the art or technique of arranging type for making the written language legible, readable and appealing when displayed. Adding hierarchy in your layout adds structure and flow to your design. At first glance, it might not be possible to imagine any correlation between typography and mathematics. However, typography is a blend of letter forms and mathematical proportions.

The Golden Ratio can be used to create a guide for typography sizes. If you breakdown a three-line text by importance in three sections named A, B and C you’d be able to understand the golden ratio a whole lot better. Suppose C is the least important piece of information you have, and you use the size 10 px for its content. If you need to figure out what size of the text to use for more critical text B you would multiply the font size of C by 1.618.

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Using Golden Ratio for Photography

Photographers always have a guiding principle that they use when taking photographs. There are many guiding principles in photography that help photographers better frame their picture. One such guideline or rule is known as The Rule of Thirds. The rule of thirds essentially is dividing a composition into 9 equal parts, by dividing the frame with two equidistant vertical and horizontal lines. The points where these lines intersect are known as intersection points. The idea of using the rule of one third is that the subject should be placed on the intersection points in a way that the subject only takes up one third of the frame. This can also be done in post-editing using grid lines. Another such guideline is the Golden Ratio.

Golden Ratio works best when you are trying to create a perfect sense of harmony in your images. Now unlike the rule of thirds, using golden ratio when taking a photograph can be a little trickier, especially when you’re new to the concept. Using the Golden Spiral in post-production is one of the best ways to go around it. You can do this by overlaying the spiral on top of your image. This would help you see which elements of the picture sit where and if they’re creating harmony together. It also allows you to identify focal points and where they need to be. It can also be used to understand which elements need to be moved for giving the design more energy.

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Creating Logo Design

Logos are one of the most critical aspects of business identity. It helps new potential customers identify your brand, and old customers to retain your services and products through your logo. A logo helps create the first impression of the business’s values and relevance to its audience. By using the Golden Ratio for designing logos will help people instantly connect to the brand. An excellent example of this is how many famous brands like Twitter, Apple, even Pepsi use it to design their logo. You can use the Fibonacci sequence to make logos by creating a circular sequence and then rearranging them and forming a grid that would work as the basic framework for your logo design.

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Designing and Creating Layouts

Layouts are the arrangements of various elements on a page that usually refers to a specific placement on text, image and the style. The proper layout helps enhance the look of a particular object individually and also as a whole. For successful layouts the two criteria that need to be kept in mind are individual visual elements and their relationship.

There are many layout options available to designers. One of them is the “Z” layout which takes inspiration from the letter “Z” itself. It generally shows the path that a reader sees of the elements on a page or a design. Another layout principle is the Golden Ratio. The Golden Spiral works best when you have many elements that might differ from each other to be arranged in a single layout. It is seen that people are naturally drawn to the center of the spiral when witnessing a Golden Spiral. This gives a designer the insight to place the most important element in the center of the spiral

Understanding the Golden Ratio can be very helpful for design practices. It is a mathematical approach to design that stands out from other design practices. Since it is naturally seen in so many instances we tend to appreciate any design that uses its principles many times without even realizing it. Just remember the constant ratio 1:1.618 and keep using it in different instances and places.

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